callback({"json":{"channel":{"title":"MSU Events Calendar","link":"http://events.msu.edu/?calendarid=default","description":null,"language":"en-us","item":[{"title":"Clinician Perspectives on the Potential of DBS for Pediatric Patients with Treatment-Resistant OCD","link":"http://events.msu.edu/main.php?view=event&calendarid=default&eventid=1669927221064","description":"02/15/2023: 1:30pm Conferences / Seminars / Lectures Join us for this free webinar from Michelle T. Pham, PhD, presented as part of the 2022-2023 Bioethics Public Seminar Series. Register: https://bit.ly/bioethics-pham\r\n\r\nThe World Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery has argued that at least two successful randomized controlled trials should be available before deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment for a psychiatric disorder is considered "established." DBS is currently offered to children ages 7 and older with refractory dystonia under an FDA-humanitarian device exemption. No randomized control trials were conducted - practitioners relied on evidence from DBS use in adults. In addition, accumulated research supports the safety and effectiveness of DBS for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in adults (Wu et al. 2021). Approximately 10-20% of children with OCD have treatment-resistant presentations, so it is likely that there will be interest in offering DBS for some children (POTS 2004). Both ethical and empirical anticipatory work is needed to evaluate whether, and if so, under what conditions it might be appropriate to offer DBS in this context. This seminar will present qualitative data from semi-structured interviews with 24 clinicians with expertise in this area regarding: (a) acceptable levels of evidence to offer DBS in this patient population and (b) institutional policies or protocols needed to effectively provide care for them.","msu:eventid":"1669927221064","msu:sponsorid":"93","msu:inputsponsor":"Administration","msu:displayedsponsor":"Center for Bioethics and Social Justice","msu:displayedsponsorurl":"http://www.bioethics.msu.edu/","msu:date":"02/15/2023","msu:time":"1:30pm - 2:30pm","msu:timebegin":"1:30pm","msu:timeend":"2:30pm","msu:timebeginalt":"13:30","msu:timeendalt":"14:30","msu:categoryid":"8","msu:description1":"Join us for this free webinar from Michelle T. Pham, PhD, presented as part of the 2022-2023 Bioethics Public Seminar Series. Register: https://bit.ly/bioethics-pham\r\n\r\nThe World Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery has argued that at least two successful randomized controlled trials should be available before deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment for a psychiatric disorder is considered "established." DBS is currently offered to children ages 7 and older with refractory dystonia under an FDA-humanitarian device exemption. No randomized control trials were conducted - practitioners relied on evidence from DBS use in adults. In addition, accumulated research supports the safety and effectiveness of DBS for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in adults (Wu et al. 2021). Approximately 10-20% of children with OCD have treatment-resistant presentations, so it is likely that there will be interest in offering DBS for some children (POTS 2004). Both ethical and empirical anticipatory work is needed to evaluate whether, and if so, under what conditions it might be appropriate to offer DBS in this context. This seminar will present qualitative data from semi-structured interviews with 24 clinicians with expertise in this area regarding: (a) acceptable levels of evidence to offer DBS in this patient population and (b) institutional policies or protocols needed to effectively provide care for them.","msu:category":"Conferences / Seminars / Lectures","msu:location":"Virtual (Zoom webinar)","msu:location_map":"","msu:price":"free","msu:contact_name":"Liz McDaniel","msu:contact_phone":"","msu:contact_email":"center@msu.edu","msu:url":"https://bioethics.msu.edu/public-seminars/22-23-series","msu:recordchangedtime":"2023-01-12 09:50:52"},{"title":"Expedient Classification: Diagnosis in Lived Experience and Medical Practice","link":"http://events.msu.edu/main.php?view=event&calendarid=default&eventid=1674159514593","description":"03/22/2023: 1:30pm Conferences / Seminars / Lectures Join us for this free webinar from Megh Marathe, PhD, presented as part of the 2022-2023 Bioethics Public Seminar Series. Register: https://bit.ly/bioethics-marathe.\r\n\r\nThis talk examines how doctors and patients distinguish between normal and pathological events through the case of epilepsy. Epilepsy is a chronic illness and disability characterized by recurrent and unpredictable seizures. Seizures are transient events during which people lose control over parts of body-mind function. The talk shows that the diagnostic boundary between seizure and non-seizure events is fluid, dynamic, and porous in lived experience and medical practice. Calling an event a seizure has consequences well beyond treatment, also affecting a patient's financial stability, social participation, and life aspirations. Hence, doctors and patients take an expedient approach to classifying seizures, informally modifying the very definition of seizure to postpone or avoid severe consequences. Doing so enables doctors and patients to bend rigid classification schemes to suit the complex realities of people's lives. This work advances scholarship on classification and expertise in information studies, science and technology studies, and disability studies.","msu:eventid":"1674159514593","msu:sponsorid":"93","msu:inputsponsor":"Administration","msu:displayedsponsor":"Center for Bioethics and Social Justice","msu:displayedsponsorurl":"http://www.bioethics.msu.edu/","msu:date":"03/22/2023","msu:time":"1:30pm - 2:30pm","msu:timebegin":"1:30pm","msu:timeend":"2:30pm","msu:timebeginalt":"13:30","msu:timeendalt":"14:30","msu:categoryid":"8","msu:description1":"Join us for this free webinar from Megh Marathe, PhD, presented as part of the 2022-2023 Bioethics Public Seminar Series. Register: https://bit.ly/bioethics-marathe.\r\n\r\nThis talk examines how doctors and patients distinguish between normal and pathological events through the case of epilepsy. Epilepsy is a chronic illness and disability characterized by recurrent and unpredictable seizures. Seizures are transient events during which people lose control over parts of body-mind function. The talk shows that the diagnostic boundary between seizure and non-seizure events is fluid, dynamic, and porous in lived experience and medical practice. Calling an event a seizure has consequences well beyond treatment, also affecting a patient's financial stability, social participation, and life aspirations. Hence, doctors and patients take an expedient approach to classifying seizures, informally modifying the very definition of seizure to postpone or avoid severe consequences. Doing so enables doctors and patients to bend rigid classification schemes to suit the complex realities of people's lives. This work advances scholarship on classification and expertise in information studies, science and technology studies, and disability studies.","msu:category":"Conferences / Seminars / Lectures","msu:location":"Virtual (Zoom webinar)","msu:location_map":"","msu:price":"free","msu:contact_name":"Liz McDaniel","msu:contact_phone":"","msu:contact_email":"center@msu.edu","msu:url":"https://bioethics.msu.edu/public-seminars/22-23-series","msu:recordchangedtime":"2023-01-25 16:49:26"},{"title":"How Brain Death Declarations Can Harm, and Why Legal Exemptions Should Be the Rule","link":"http://events.msu.edu/main.php?view=event&calendarid=default&eventid=1669927338838","description":"04/19/2023: 1:30pm Conferences / Seminars / Lectures Join us for this free webinar from Jennifer L. McCurdy, PhD, BSN, MH, HEC-C, presented as part of the 2022-2023 Bioethics Public Seminar Series. Register: https://bit.ly/bioethics-mccurdy\r\n\r\nAccording to U.S. law and The Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA), an individual can be declared dead by either cardiac or neurological criteria. The latter, known colloquially as brain death, allows a physician to withdraw patients from medical devices against the wishes of families and other surrogates. While once seemingly settled, the concept of death by neurological criteria has increasingly become a topic of controversy, both technically and philosophically. This seminar will argue that the UDDA should make New Jersey-style legal exemptions to brain death declaration a national guideline, thus allowing individuals to claim a religious exemption when they disagree that brain death is, in fact, death. Why? Because the concept of brain death is based on a specific eurochristian worldview that is not held in common by many reasonable people in U.S. society. The imposition of those unshared worldviews on patients and their loved ones through force of law causes unjustified and avoidable trauma, furthers epistemic injustices, and generates distrust.","msu:eventid":"1669927338838","msu:sponsorid":"93","msu:inputsponsor":"Administration","msu:displayedsponsor":"Center for Bioethics and Social Justice","msu:displayedsponsorurl":"http://www.bioethics.msu.edu/","msu:date":"04/19/2023","msu:time":"1:30pm - 2:30pm","msu:timebegin":"1:30pm","msu:timeend":"2:30pm","msu:timebeginalt":"13:30","msu:timeendalt":"14:30","msu:categoryid":"8","msu:description1":"Join us for this free webinar from Jennifer L. McCurdy, PhD, BSN, MH, HEC-C, presented as part of the 2022-2023 Bioethics Public Seminar Series. Register: https://bit.ly/bioethics-mccurdy\r\n\r\nAccording to U.S. law and The Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA), an individual can be declared dead by either cardiac or neurological criteria. The latter, known colloquially as brain death, allows a physician to withdraw patients from medical devices against the wishes of families and other surrogates. While once seemingly settled, the concept of death by neurological criteria has increasingly become a topic of controversy, both technically and philosophically. This seminar will argue that the UDDA should make New Jersey-style legal exemptions to brain death declaration a national guideline, thus allowing individuals to claim a religious exemption when they disagree that brain death is, in fact, death. Why? Because the concept of brain death is based on a specific eurochristian worldview that is not held in common by many reasonable people in U.S. society. The imposition of those unshared worldviews on patients and their loved ones through force of law causes unjustified and avoidable trauma, furthers epistemic injustices, and generates distrust.","msu:category":"Conferences / Seminars / Lectures","msu:location":"Virtual (Zoom webinar)","msu:location_map":"","msu:price":"free","msu:contact_name":"Liz McDaniel","msu:contact_phone":"","msu:contact_email":"center@msu.edu","msu:url":"https://bioethics.msu.edu/public-seminars/22-23-series","msu:recordchangedtime":"2023-01-12 09:53:17"}]}}})